Podcast Cover art for mission-critical leadership podcast episode 6

Every day, we are all blessed with the power of personal choice.

We all face the tension. Faith or fear. Courage or cowardice. To be brave or be afraid.

Each and every action we make influences our future and brings us closer to our final destiny.

Do you like the trajectory you’re on?

That’s the question we wrestle with in today’s episode.

In This Episode

In this episode, we talk about the power of personal choice. Justin shares his family history and how one courageous choice, made over 100 years ago, has directly affected him today. For four generations, this story has been shared in his family, and he plans to share it for another four. Podcast Cover art for mission-critical leadership podcast episode 6

We also talk about:

  • Your “rocking chair” reflection.
  • Coaching the gap from where you are to where you want to be.
  • How you can reshape your future destination through deliberate action.
  • What’s at stake in your personal legacy.

 

Thank you for listening, be sure to subscribe and leave a 5* review so we can continue to reach more mission-critical leaders.

About Justin

Dr. Justin Hiebert works with mission-critical leaders to accomplish the unimaginable. Realizing that no leader has ever needed more things to do, he works with his clients to get the right things done. His clients rise above burnout, captivate their teams, and transform their communities. By engaging their hearts and minds, his clients unlock their full potential to be, do, and have it all. This affords them the ability to leave a legacy of influence and impact on the world. He is a husband, father, teacher, learner, and champion of joy. He resides in Bakersfield with his wife, four kids, two cats, and one dog. In his free time, he loves exercising, riding motorcycles, and doing anything outdoors.

Podcast cover art for episode 4

There is great power in knowing your calling. You must be able to answer the question, “Why on earth am I on earth?” This is the true source of power, transformation, and engagement with the world.

But once you know your calling, you must take action.

This is what I mean by violence of action. By knowing your calling, you can commit to making the world a better place.

For some, their calling and their job are the same. For others, the job pays the bills while the calling fills the soul.

In either case, don’t assume the task is the calling. To-do lists are never a calling. Instead, you are called to serve, give, and bless others. Your calling, your chance for greatness, is always about others. Doing that well gives you a source of abundant joy.

Don’t settle for mediocrity, pursue greatness.

On This Episode

On this episode, we talk about:

  • The importance of knowing your calling Podcast cover art for episode 4
  • How to overcome inactivity
  • When to take violence of action.
  • The 5 signs when it’s time for a change.

About Justin

Dr. Justin Hiebert works with mission-critical leaders to accomplish the unimaginable. Realizing that no leader has ever needed more things to do, he works with his clients to get the right things done. His clients rise above burnout, captivate their teams, and transform their communities. By engaging their hearts and minds, his clients unlock their full potential to be, do, and have it all. This affords them the ability to leave a legacy of influence and impact on the world. He is a husband, father, teacher, learner, and champion of joy. He resides in Bakersfield with his wife, four kids, two cats, and one dog. In his free time, he loves exercising, riding motorcycles, and doing anything outdoors.

Blog Post Cover Art

Every Monday, I spend time in an intentional review process. By asking myself five powerful questions, I can radically transform my intention and direction for the week. These five powerful questions keep me focused and directed on my long-term goals.

The Weekly Review

The weekly review process is one I implemented several years ago when I started using Michael Hyatt’s Full Focus Planner (here’s a link to a video series I did walking through everything). If I’m honest, at first, I found it tedious. Then, I went through a phase of outright rejection. Finally, I committed myself to the process.

Now, it’s something I can’t live without. Blog Post Cover Art

Setting aside time every week to track my goals, check in with myself, and stay grounded in what matters most has radically transformed my life.

As a result, I’ve created five powerful questions that help summarize the process of review that I do every week.

5 Powerful Questions

1.) What happened?

I start with what was. What happened last week that I need to be aware of? Was there anything of significance? How did I do on my goals? What targets did I miss, and what tasks did I fail to do?

I don’t spend a lot of time here, but the weeks are so busy and full of stuff that it can be helpful for me to remember what happened as I plan my new week.

2.) What is happening?

Now I start to look forward. What is happening this week? Where are my meetings? Who am I trying to connect with? Is there anything unique or special that I agreed to months ago that I have forgotten about?

As a calendar-driven person, I sometimes make appointments weeks in advance. They get written down when I make the appointment, but it’s common that it slips my mind after that. Spending time every week looking ahead refreshes my memory and allows me to be prepared.

3.) Who do I need to be?

I’m a big believer that we don’t so much chase goals as we chase being the person capable of handling those goals. It’s a subtle difference, but here’s an example:

I want to have a strong, healthy, vibrant marriage.

This is a goal. I might even attempt to define it better by making it a S.M.A.R.T.E.R goal, but it’s a goal.

Contrast it with the following statement:

I want to be the type of person that can have a strong, healthy, vibrant marriage.

Small difference, but a big change.

One is focused on an end result. Great! I’ve got a good marriage!

The other focuses on the continual growth process. How do I get an even better marriage this week?

By focusing on the type of person I need to be in the world, it keeps me growing and focused on intentionally bettering myself.

4.) Who do I need to help?

I work with mission-critical leaders. These are people that are ultimately living their life in service to others. I want to orient myself in the same way.

Part of my business model is to help others. By setting aside time every week to pass on referrals, extend my network, seek a service opportunity, or look for donation options, I give myself time every week to give back to the community I care about.

5.) What matters most?

This one reminds me of why I do what I do.

What sounds good when I’m hungry? Junk food.

What matters most? Healthy food options are ready when I don’t have willpower.

What sounds fun when I’m tired? Video games.

What really gives me life and energy when I need some? Gardening. Reading. Friends. There are a whole lot more beneficial options for me than video games.

By keeping focused on what matters most, I pre-set my brain to autopilot so I don’t have to make hard choices when I lack discipline, willpower, motivation, or time.

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What about you? How do you plan your week for success? Leave tips below!

Blog Post Cover Art two people mapping out a journey with a computer and paper, one person sipping coffee. Overlay text Amateurs have goals, professionals have process.

Recently, I was reminded about the importance of developing the process of growth and achievement.

As I was scrolling through social media, I came across the following quote:

Amateurs have goals, professionals have a process.

In the myth of new year new you, it’s popular for people to set goals. Rarely do they ever achieve those goals. Now, some are now actively warning you not to do it.

The failure to attain these goals, really to gain any motivation or traction for change, can be found in that nuance.

I’ve written before about how to write clear and compelling goals.

What makes all the difference in the world, is the process to make it stick.

Setting Goals

Here’s a quick recap on how to set good goals: S.M.A.R.T.E.R.

Specific – Is it clear?

Measurable – Can it be defined?

Achievable – Is it possible?

Relevant – Do I really want it?

Timely – When does it need to be done by?

Energy – What’s the feeling I gain by achieving the desired result?

Reward – How can I remind myself it all matters?

Notice the difference between these two “goals”

I will lose weight.

OR Blog Post Cover Art two people mapping out a journey with a computer and paper, one person sipping coffee. Overlay text Amateurs have goals, professionals have process.

I will lose 25 pounds by March 15. This will give me extra energy and confidence for the cruise my wife and I are taking to celebrate our anniversary over spring break. When I lose those twenty-five pounds, I will reward myself with a new swimsuit for the trip.

Amateurs have goals, professionals have process.

Develop the process.

Amateurs have goals, professionals have process.

To help develop the process in any goal you want to set, here are three quick questions you can ask yourself:

1.) Who do I need to become?

Goals, growth, and progress all require change. You cannot strive to attain something and remain the same. Identify who you need (and want) to become. Create the process and choices that will help you achieve the desired growth.

2.) What should I K.I.S.S.?

In this context, K.I.S.S. is an acronym for Keep, Improve, Start, Stop.

What is working well that I should keep doing? This is about amplifying the good.

What could be working better? This is about refinement.

What do I need to start? Action is key and sometimes we don’t get it right the first time. This is about continuous motion and improvement.

What should I stop? Not everything goes as anticipated. Sometimes, we just need to let it go.

3.) How will I avoid distraction?

We’re not perfect. I’m sure you’ve logged on to social media before to make a meaningful and business-related post only to be sucked in by mindless scrolling. It happens to everyone. Learning our personal triggers (being tired, hungry, bored, etc…) and building around those moments minimizes distractions and keeps us focused.

2022 is young and fresh. It is a year full of possibilities and I hope and pray the best for you. On your journey remember one thing:

Amateurs have goals, professionals have process.

Develop the process.

Blog post cover art that has confetti falling with overlay text that says celebrate failure

As I sit down to review my 2021 goals, I realize all I set out to do that I didn’t accomplish … that means it’s time to celebrate failure!

Understanding Failure

Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts. – Winston Churchill

It should come as no surprise that I set pretty lofty goals

As we look to wrap up an incredibly fast-moving 2021, I’m sitting down to review some of the goals I set for myself and my business. Blog post cover art that has confetti falling with overlay text that says celebrate failure

I attained relatively few of what I set out to accomplish, but I’m here to tell you that’s a good thing. It means I get to celebrate failure. And while not pleasant (or natural) it is what will keep me going in the new year.

And it is the best-kept secret of the ultra-successful.

Learning to Walk

What happens when a baby is learning to walk?

It falls over.

A lot.

No parent, in their right mind, would see their baby fall and just assume walking isn’t for them.

Well, sweetie, you tried walking once and failed. Clearly, you’re not meant to be a walker.

Ridiculous.

Instead, we pick them up. Celebrate that they were at least able to stand by themselves, and then make them try again.

Then we celebrate the first step.

The second.

Third.

Fourth.

And soon, they are running around and we just pray we can keep up.

But each milestone comes with a celebration, even in the midst of failure.

Unfortunately, somewhere along the way, we stop finding that so natural. Instead, we beat ourselves up and become our own worst critic.

(Re)Learning to celebrate failure pushes us to keep reaching for our goals and makes the status of “mission accomplished” that much more enjoyable.

Celebrate Failure

So, where am I celebrating failure as we wrap up 2021?

Here are a few of my personal highlights.

1.) Books Read

I made a goal to read 70 books this year. While I have a few weeks left, the final number will be somewhere around 40. That’s down from last year and significantly short of my goal.

So what I am celebrating? First, the quality (and most of the time length) of books I read went up. The biography of Alexander Hamilton was over 800 pages. These sorts of endeavors take longer than one or two hundred page books.

Second, I’m celebrating more implementation of these ideas. My homesteading and gardening have improved significantly. The time I could have spent reading was spent outside doing. I could say the same for my speaking content, parenting, and relationship with my wife.

Action trumps knowledge.

2.) Income generated

Wait, what? You want to celebrate not making your financial targets!?!

Well no, not really. This is one of those times where I say it’s necessary but not natural. To be honest, though, I set a really lofty goal. I more than doubled any of my previous financial goals.

And while I won’t hit that number, I can say I made significant growth over 2020 (though that wasn’t hard with a worldwide pandemic and all 😬😂).

More than my business growth, I focused on filling the need in my micro-niche. I also focused on helping others grow their businesses and their dreams. I feel as though I have succeeded at those as well.

So yes, while I didn’t hit my wild-crazy number, I did make a lot of progress in my own profession and in those, I work with.

Service trump selfishness.

3.) An amazing vacation

Maybe the hardest one for me to admit I need to celebrate is that our family won’t be taking the big fancy vacation I hoped for at the start of the year. Some of it is still certainly pandemic related, but most of it is a change in our own values. Instead, my family has simplified it’s values (and living) and adjusted the way we interact with things.

One of those big differences for me is better work-life balance. Gone (mostly) are the days of working until 8-9 pm, and starting again at 4 am. Instead, over 90% of the time, I’m done working between 4 and 5 pm. 

(This also partly explains number two above).

My kids have quality time with me almost every day.

I attended my daughter’s volleyball games.

I read books to my kids (though I’m not counting those to help me get to 70). 

I spent more time snuggling, instructing, teaching, laughing, and building.

I’ve also taken my wife on more dates this year than our previous 15 combined.

So do we get a fancy two-week vacation? No. But we are gaining so much more.

Quality trumps quantity.

I’m off to celebrate and set even bigger goals for next year.

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